Category Archives: Top 5

ABA Ireland Top 5 Recent Posts 11/10/2014

Every week on our Facebook Page, members submit dozens of posts on topics related to Behaviour Analysis, its applications and related issues. One purpose of this blog is to highlight some of the most “liked” and useful posts in order to make them available to a wider audience.

5. BCBA Results

Michelle Kelly’s post congratulating those who had passed the recent BACB BCBA exam was very popular. ABA Ireland members who recently achieved Board Certified Behaviour Analyst status include Amanda Nally, Mel Smyth, Josema Fernandez and Jen Horgan-Dorgan.

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Congrats guys!

4. Assesseing Progress and outcome of early intensive behavioural intervention for toddlers with autism

neccNewLogo

Congratulations to NECC Senior Program Director Rebecca MacDonald and her colleagues Diana Parry-Cruwys, Sally Dupere and William Ahern who recently published an article on assessing EIBI for toddlers with autism.

The study adds to the EIBI literature by using the Early Skills Assessment Tool (ESAT) to measure progress in toddlers under the age of three.  Instruction was provided through discrete trial and naturalistic teaching and was delivered in 1:1 and group settings.  Each toddler participating in the study had a team of 3-4 therapists who had 1-3 years of training in ABA and were supervised on a daily basis by a BCBA level supervisor. The supervisors received supervision from a BCBA-D on a weekly basis.

The results indicated increases in scores for all ages groups on important developmental and social measures that are commonly included in an EIBI treatment package.  Most interestingly, the increases were greatest for the 1 year old group.

To read the full article, follow this link.

3. Journal of Applied Behaviour Analysis (JABA) on Youtube

JABA now has a YouTube Channel.  While JABA plans to include things like Podcasts and video abstracts on the channel, one of the most practical utlities of the channel will be that it allows JABA contributors to post video examples of the methodology they used.  This will enable practitioners to more easily implement the procedures they read about and facilitiate more accurate replications.  It is a very welcome development. Check out this example from a recent article on serial and concurrent training methods:

2.  2nd UK & Ireland ACT CBS Conference

Ashling Curtin uploaded a draft schedule for the second UK & Ireland ACT/CBS Conference. The line-up is looking great with well-known speakers such as Steven Hayes, Dermott and Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Lisa Coyne and Eric Morris.

ACBS UKIRL

1. PSI DBA BCBA Supervision

The final useful post for this week is a link to the DBA Blog. The PSI DBA is organising a BCBA supervisor training blog to meet the requirements set by the BACB for those who wish to provide BCBA supervision.  The workshop will be run by Dr. Rita Honan. By the end of it,  those who have attended should be able to

  • describe the function of supervision

  • identify the constituents and process of a supervisory relationship

  • describe how the major models of clinical supervision can be adapted for use when supervising behaviour analysts

  • detail the key characteristics of supervisory content and practices in applied behaviour analysis

  • describe their approach to evaluation/performance feedback in the supervisory relationship

  • describe and discuss the ethical issues related to supervision

  • use information from the workshop to build a more effective model for their own supervisory practice

 

As ever, all comments are welcome.

While ABA Ireland has taken all reasonable steps to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this blog, it accepts no liability for the accuracy or quality of the information provided and no liability for this information being up-to-date or complete. Information is provided for educational and general purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional advice. Where ABA Ireland provides links to third-party websites, it accepts no liability for the content of these websites. The views of authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABA Ireland or any organisations associated with the authors of posts.

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ABA Ireland Top 5 Recent Posts (01/09/2014)

Every week on our Facebook Page, members post dozens of post on topics related to Behaviour Analysis, its applications and related issues. One purpose of this blog is to highlight some of the most “liked” and useful posts in order to make them available to a wider audience.

5. Free Online ABA CourseABA Free Course
Darragh O’Regan shared a post about an 8 week Massive Open Online Class (MOCC) titled ‘Behaviour Analysis and Therapy for Autism Spectrum Disorders”. The MOCC is provided through Southern Illinois University. If you are interested in taking the class for free, follow this link.

4. Mickey Keenan Wins BACB Michael Hemmingway Award

MK MH Award

Michelle P Kelly shared the above picture from the European Association for Behaviour Analysis’ Facebook page.  Professor Keenan of the University of Ulster became the first European to win the BACB’s Michael Hemmingway Award.  In ABA Ireland member Tersea Mulhern’s words, the award was “very well deserved”.   Readers are encouraged to visit the Images for Behaviour Analysts site if they would like more information about Professor Keenan’s work.

3. Behavioural Gerontology

ABA Ireland’s Michelle E Kelly wrote an original post on Behaviour Gerontology and Dementia this week.

Dementia 2

The post proved very popular with ABA Ireland members. If you have not read it already, scroll down  or just follow the above link.

2.  PBIS – FBA to BSP

Another really useful post featured on our Facebook page this week, was Darragh O’Regan’s link to the Positive Behavior Intervention and Support’s website. The link provided materials for a seven module training series  on Functional Behavioural Assessment and Behaviour Support Plans.
PBISThe PBIS site has lots of other really useful links for behaviour analysts and those working with challenging behaviour, so take a look.

1. Ignore the IQ Test – Your Level of Intelligence is not Fixed For Life

Bryan Roche

The final useful post for this week was a link to Bryan Roche’s article on Intelligence and IQ on The Conversation website. Bryan is a lecturer in behavioural psychology at NUI Maynooth and is well-known within behaviour analysis as a researcher with expertise in Relational Frame Theory.   In conclusion to his piece, Bryan wrote:

My own research, in the field of relational frame theory, has shown that understanding relations between words, such as “more than”, “less than” or “opposite” is crucial for our intellectual development. One recent pilot study showed that we can considerably raise standard IQ scores by training children in relational language skills tasks over a period of months. Again, this finding challenges the idea that intelligence is fixed for life.

So it’s about time we reconsidered our ideas about the nature of intelligence as a trait that cannot be changed. Undoubtedly, there may be some limits to the development of our intellectual skills. But in the short term, the socially responsible thing to do is not to feel bound by those limits, but to help every child work towards and even exceed them.

While the article is fascinating on its own terms, Behaviour Analysts will also find it useful to read the comments section to see how Bryan deals with misconceptions around intelligence and offers a behavioural alternative to the dominant discourse on the subject.

As ever, all comments are welcome.

While ABA Ireland has taken all reasonable steps to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this blog, it accepts no liability for the accuracy or quality of the information provided and no liability for this information being up-to-date or complete. Information is provided for educational and general purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional advice. Where ABA Ireland provides links to third-party websites, it accepts no liability for the content of these websites. The views of authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABA Ireland or any organisations associated with the authors of posts.

ABA Ireland Top 5 Recent Posts (24/08/2014)

Every week on our Facebook Page, members post dozens of post on topics related to Behaviour Analysis, its applications and related issues. One purpose of this blog is to highlight some of the most “liked” and useful posts in order to make them available to a wider audience.

5. Candy Waters’ Artwork
candy

Sandy Waters – mother of  the artist Candy Waters – recently posted some of her daughter’s impressive artwork. The posts proved popular and quickly attracted 50 likes from impressed ABA Ireland members.  Candy is a non-verbal 12 year old young lady with severe autism.   She has attracted media attention and has her own Facebook page.  To see more of her artwork and to learn more about Candy, follow the above link.

4. Denis O’Hora and Farm Safety

Dennis & IFA

ABA Ireland’s Denis O’Hora recently attracted media attention for his recently keynote address at the national conference on farm safety.  The conference was organised by the Health and Safety Authority, Teagasc, and the Farm Safety Partnership and took place in Kilkenny.

Agriland reported that Dr O’Hora addressed the importance of identifying  near-misses and acknowledging the stresses faced by lone farmers working :

Close calls, he said are much more common than deaths and are lead indicators. “We have to identify these near misses. We have to learn from farmers what is going on. Close calls are a moment where people can make a change.”

He said that farmers need to take the time to pay full attention to what they are doing and its not just stressful situations that cause distractions. “You’re working, thinking about the kids coming home at the weekend and how great it will be to see them, even this positive thought can take you out of the moment and distract you.”

Lone workers, across the board in industry, are more likely to be involved in safety incidents, he said. “Being self employed means you are the CEO, the plumber, the accountant, the site manager. And self employment tends to happen more in dangerous industries.

“Because you have all of these roles, you will be better at some than others. And the ones you are not so good at you tend to leave till last. It’s human nature. Each additional role increases stress. You’ve got to learn to work in a ‘wise’ way of working.”

3. Meme of the Week

We had several popular memes this week. Most of these were shared from Behaviour Man or the ICBSR . The most popular one featured Kermit the Frog and offered the following words of wisdom:

Kermit

Behaviour Man expanded on Kermit’s words by noting:

If an individual’s behavior continues to occur, it is very likely that this is a product of the reinforcing variables in their environment. If we have a close relationship to that individual, it is also very likely that our actions (behavior) may contribute to reinforcing their behavior–as we are a part of their environment. Until consistent change (on our behalf) is maintained in the environment, we are not likely to affect change in their behavior. Therefore, we must always look to ourselves as a possible cause (or reinforcing factor) of the behavior, and not blame the individual if the behavior continues to occur.

2.  The Ups and Downs of “Behaviorese”

Doireann O’Brien shared a really interesting article written by Andy Lattal and posted on the Aubrey Daniels Institute website.

Andy’s article described a debate within the field of behaviour analysis about the utility of what he terms “Behaviorese” – that is the “technical terms, neologisms, and acronyms” associated with the science of behaviour.  He notes that:

Such word usage is of great value to those within what we in behavior analysis call a particular “verbal community” (another such technical term …sigh). Within these communities, technical terms and expressions assume that everyone is on the same page with respect to their meaning. When people are, the terms work very well in communicating quickly and precisely. Huge problems can arise, however, when any “in crowd” lingo is used outside the verbal community in which it developed.  Confusion, apprehension, miscommunication, and failures to accomplish goals all can result when there is a mismatch between what the speaker is saying and the listener is hearing.

He describes the various opinions that are present within behaviour analysis to “Behaviorese” and then notes that:

The proof of the pudding, though, is in the eating. The real question is whether being able to describe a term with the precision found in the larger group’s use of that term makes any difference in how precisely the student applies the term in their research or practice.  One meaning of “understanding” is to do something, whether it is parrot a definition or implement a contingency. This requires research that we have not yet conducted.

 

1. Review Shows Big Increase in Science Backing Behavioural Therapy

autism speaks

The final post for this weeks came to ABA Ireland via Autism Speaks who reported on a new report indicating an increase in the quantity and quality of research supporting behavioural therapy for children with autism.  The report was compiled for the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and is available here.

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With regard to ABA, the review included:

RCTs of the UCLA/Lovaas-focused approach, a developmentally focused ESDM approach, aschool delivered training (LEAP), as well as prospective comparisons of eclectic variants of ABA approaches.

The authors found that:

Across approaches, children receiving early intensive behavioral and developmental interventions have demonstrated improvements in cognitive, language, adaptive,
and ASD impairments compared with children receiving low-intensity interventions and eclecticnon-ABA based intervention approaches.

They concluded that:

These improvements allow us to make some stronger conclusions about certain elements of
the behavioral intervention literature. Considerable and consistent evidence suggests that
early behavioral and developmental intervention based on the principles of ABA delivered in intensive (>15 hours per week) and comprehensive (i.e., addressing numerous areas of functioning) form can significantly affect the development of some children with ASD.

 

 

That’s all for this week.

All comments welcome.

While ABA Ireland has taken all reasonable steps to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this blog, it accepts no liability for the accuracy or quality of the information provided and no liability for this information being up-to-date or complete. Information is provided for educational and general purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional advice. Where ABA Ireland provides links to third-party websites, it accepts no liability for the content of these websites. The views of authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABA Ireland or any organisations associated with the authors of posts.

ABA Ireland Top 5 Posts 17/08/2014

Every week on our Facebook Page, members post dozens of post on topics related to Behaviour Analysis, its applications and related issues. One purpose of this blog is to highlight some of the most “liked” and useful posts in order to make them available to a wider audience.

5. Introduction to RFT

Foxy Learning’s online tutorial on Relational Frame Theory is now 10 years old.   In those ten years, over 15,000 people have accessed the free tutorial to learn more about RFT and its applications.  If you have an interest in this area of behaviour analysis, it is well worth a visit.

Foxy RFT

4. Grace App Research Opportunities

Lisa Domican – creator of the Grace App – has kindly offered to provide ABA students with “free training, free codes for download and where needed a loan device” if they are interested in carrying out research into the App’s effectiveness.  Many app designers make unsubstantiated claims about the effectiveness of their products so it is great to see Lisa working with behaviour analysts to demonstrate the app’s benefits for people with communication difficulties. Hopefully, other designers will follow her example.

Grace Ap

3. Cookie Kid

One again, Behaviour Man has provided us with another ABA based Meme featuring a skeptical toddler coming to terms with the benefits of the differential reinforcement of alternative behaviours.

Cookie Kid

 

2.  Supernanny (and Lynn Koegel) tackle Autism

Lots of ABA Ireland members liked this online video of an episode of Supernanny in which Supernanny enlists the help of the well respected behaviour analyst Lynn Koegel to help a child with autism learn to communicate and manage his emotions better.


 

1. Sunday Express  – How a controversial therapy has changed my autistic daughter’s life

The final post that we’ll feature this week is an article from the UK based Sunday Express newspaper. An unfortunate headline aside, the article offers an excellent description of the benefits of ABA for children with autism.
Tracey Holliday and Freya

Contributors to the article include Tracey Halliday, Jane McCready (of ABA4all )and Dr Francesca degli Espinosa.  Autism parents and professionals in the UK are doing a great job of highlighting issues facing those who need access to ABA and addressing some of the misconceptions around the science. If you haven’t already liked the ABA4all page on Facebook, we recommend you do.

 

That’s all for this week.

All comments welcome.

While ABA Ireland has taken all reasonable steps to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this blog, it accepts no liability for the accuracy or quality of the information provided and no liability for this information being up-to-date or complete. Information is provided for educational and general purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional advice. Where ABA Ireland provides links to third-party websites, it accepts no liability for the content of these websites. The views of authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABA Ireland or any organisations associated with the authors of posts.

Top 5 Posts of Last Week (20/07/2014)

Every week on our Facebook Page, members post dozens of post on topics related to Behaviour Analysis, its applications and related issues. One purpose of this blog is to highlight some of the most “liked” posts in order to make them available to a wider audience.

This week our top 5 posts are:

5. Cuts to St. Catherine’s Association

st cats

There have been a number of posts this week related to cuts to St. Catherine’s Association in Wicklow. The HSE is reported to have made cuts of 500,000 euro to the service without warning. St. Catherine’s is well known to ABA supporters in Ireland. It was the centre of a protracted High Court challenge on the subject of providing ABA to children with autism and remains one of the few centres in Ireland where the families of children with autism and intellectual disabilities can access ABA.

Keith posted a link to this petition which aims to pressure the HSE into reversing the funding cuts. Readers are encouraged to sign and share it.

4. A Behaviour View of Sleep Throughout the Lifetime

An upcoming workshop by Professor Neville Blampied of the University of Canterbury in Christchurch on the topic of sleep seems to be of interest to many ABA Ireland members. Professor Blampied will be presenting workshops and lectures on the topic in TCD, NUIM and at QUB.

3. RASID Call for Papers

Louise McHugh posted this link to a call for papers from Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders on the subject of Derived Relational Responding in Autism Spectrum Disorders. This is a popular area of research in Ireland so hopefully we will see lots of Irish researchers featured when the special issue of the journal is published.

2.  Science Versus Pseudoscience

Louise shared a photo from IFLS:

IFLS Pseudoscience

One member related the image back to the provision of services for people with autism noting that interventions that lack an evidence base are widely funded in Ireland while ABA is not. IFLS is highly recommended and deserves great credit for encouraging people to learn more about science and how it differs from pseudoscience.

1. Labour Committed to Funding and Recognising Autistic SchoolsJan O'Sullivan

Ruairi Quinn has left the Department of Education and Skills and been replaced by Labour’s Jan O’Sullivan. Michelle shared a link (originally posted by QUART) to a 2007 press release from the then opposition TD.

On the subject of the costs of providing ABA to children with autism Jan stated:

This is an extremely small price to pay for giving autistic children the best possible start by providing education directly catered towards their needs

Some posters were skeptical about the possibility of the Minister changing her new department’s policy. One noted that tendency of her predecessors to conveniently forget their pre-election positions when power while another pointed out that words are cheap when in opposition. At least one member felt that we should “give her a chance and wait and see what she does” as ” its all about measuring behaviour in the end, even the behaviour of Ministers.”

That’s all for this week. All comments welcome.

While ABA Ireland has taken all reasonable steps to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this blog, it accepts no liability for the accuracy or quality of the information provided and no liability for this information being up-to-date or complete. Information is provided for educational and general purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional advice. Where ABA Ireland provides links to third-party websites, it accepts no liability for the content of these websites. The views of authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of ABA Ireland or any organisations associated with the authors of posts.